The Cult

Joel Voorman
The Cult
The Cult

On the Electric 13 trek, The Cult will play their 1987 Rick Rubin-produced landmark album ‘Electric’ in its entirety for the first time ever. Each tour stop will feature a first set of the platinum-selling ‘Electric’ boasting standouts like “Love Removal Machine,” ‘Wild Flower’ and “Lil’ Devil” and a second set highlighting The Cult’s 30-year catalogue of hits. The Cult is set to release new material in 2014 to follow-up to their 2012 album ‘Weapon of Choice,’ and a double album called ‘Electric Peace’ is due out July 30th.

“I am very excited about the Electric 13 tour,” shares bassist Chris Wyse. “Playing the record from top to bottom makes for an amazing set. This is sure to be one of the best Cult tours yet.”

The Cult started as a post-punk band with singles such as “She Sells Sanctuary,” before breaking mainstream in the United States in the late 1980s as a hard rock band with singles such as “Love Removal Machine” and “Fire Woman.” The band fuse a “heavy metal revivalist” sound with the “pseudo-mysticism … of The Doors [and] the guitar-orchestrations of Led Zeppelin … while adding touches of post-punk goth-rock.”

The Cult released the album ‘Love’ in 1985, which charted at No. 4 in the United Kingdom, and which included singles such as “She Sells Sanctuary” and “Rain.” In the late 1980’s, the band supplemented their post-punk sound with hard rock in their third album, ‘Electric;’ the polish on this new sound was facilitated by Rick Rubin, who produced the record. Their fourth album,’Sonic Temple,’ proceeded in a similar vein, and these two LPs enabled them to break into the North American market. After splitting in 1995, the band reunited in 1999 and recorded the album ‘Beyond Good’ and in 2006, the band reformed again to perform a series of worldwide tours and to eventually record new music.

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With just the right blend of psychedelia and hypnotic grooves, opening act White Hills weaves in and out of anthemic chants, deep space bleeps and other worldly madness for a mix that proves to be intoxicating. Since the release of the band’s debut album, listeners have been praising their originality and unique brand of heavy space rock.

White Hills’ sophomore release for Thrill Jockey Records, ‘H-p1’ is the cry for the disenfranchised, the exposure of the ills that the corporate-controlled governmental system has put in place.

“[White Hills is] one of the years gnarliest psych slabs – a schizophrenic trip through Acid Mothers Temple riff bludgeon, Boris chug, shaggy pseudo-grunge, and tender bursts of formless noise.” Village Voice
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[box_info]Reserved balcony seats are priced at $47. General admission floor tix (standing room only) are priced at $36. Prices noted include all fees. Tickets can be purchased in person at the House of Blues box office or online, below:

>>PURCHASE TICKETS<<[/box_info]
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